Our Common Read invites participants to read and discuss the same book in a given period of time. A Common Read can build community and foster personal growth by giving diverse people a shared experience, shared language, and a basis for deep, meaningful conversations. 

Parable of the Sower: by Octavia Butler

When global climate change and economic crises led to social chaos in the early 2020s, California became full of dangers, from pervasive water shortage to masses of vagabonds who will do anything to live to see another day. Fifteen-year-old Lauren Olamina lives inside a gated community with her preacher father, family, and neighbors, sheltered from the surrounding anarchy.

Precocious and clear-eyed, Lauren must make her voice heard in order to protect her loved ones from the imminent disasters her small community stubbornly ignores. But what begins as a fight for survival soon leads to something much more: the birth of a new faith… and a startling vision of human destiny.

About the Author:

Octavia Estelle Butler was an American science fiction writer, one of the best-known among the few African-American women in the field. She won both Hugo and Nebula awards. In 1995, she became the first science fiction writer to receive the MacArthur Foundation “Genius” Grant.

Register in advance for the discussion on Saturday, April 27, at 10:00 AM on Zoom.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Past Common Reads

  • On Repentance and Repair: Making Amends in an Unapologetic World by Danya Ruttenberg
  • Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann
  • Deacon King Kong by James McBride
  • Mistakes and Miricles by Nancy Palmer Jones and Karin Lin
  • Kindred by Octavia Bulter
  • Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides
  • The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
  • The Girl with the Louding Voice by Abi Dare
  • The Artist’s Way by Julia Cameron
  • The Night Watchman by Louise Erdrich
  • The Midnight Library by Matt Haig
  • Breathe by Imani Perry
  • The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek by Michele Richarson
  • The Cooking Gene by Michael W. Twitty
  • Choke Hold by Paul Butler
  • This Tender Land by William Kent Krueger 
  • Washington Black by Esi Edugyun
  • On the Come Up by Angie Thomas
  • An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz OR An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States for Young People adapted by Jean Mendoza and Debbie Reese
  • The Overstory by Richard Powers
  • Dispatches from Pluto: Lost and Found in the Mississippi Delta by Richard Grant
  • Justice on Earth: People of Faith Working at the Intersections of Race, Class, and the Environment by Manish Mishra-Marzetti and Jennifer Nordstrom
  • American Gods by Neil Gaiman
  • The Book of Joy by Desmund Tutu & Dalai Lama
  • The Buddha in the Attic by Julie Otsuka
  • Daring Democracy: Igniting Power, Meaning and Connection for the America We Want by Frances Moore Lappe & Adam Eichen
  • The Righteous Mind: Why Good People are Divided by Religion and Politics by Jonathan Haidt
  • Beyond Words: What Animals Think & Feel by Carl Safina
  • Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis by J. D. Vance
  • The Third Reconstruction by The Reverend Dr. William J. Barber II
  • Defying the Nazis: The Sharps’ War
  • LaRose by Louise Erdrich
  • To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Behind the Kitchen Door by Sarumathi Jayaraman
  • Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson
  • The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander